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Book Review: there is no f*cking secret: letters from a badass bitch – I loved this book!


there is no f*cking secret

letters from a badass bitch

by Kelly Osbourne

Anyone who has seen Kelly Osbourne on the Osbournes when it was a smash it television reality series has preconceived notions and thoughts about her. If you watched her on Fashion Police or E! Live from the Red Carpet you more than likely have preconceived opinions of her.

Personally, I thought she was a strong woman who loved her family, wasn’t afraid to buck the system with fashion and her opinions. Kelly says what she feels in no uncertain language to whoever is around to hear it. Those thoughts were mostly accurate, but Kelly Osbourne is so much more than my perception of her, which is, I am sure, of most celebrities.

Kelly wrote her book in a series of letters. Each one is either to a person, such as her mom, dad and brother Jack, all of which she is crazy about and would do anything for them if they needed her. Other people she wrote to include celebrities like Joan Rivers whom she knew since she was six and body parts such as her vagina, lavender hair and mouth.

She also addresses deeply personal issues (yes, I know probably I should have put her vagina here, but seriously, it IS just another body part) such as her battle with drugs and rehab, social media, Ozzfest, London, dating, bullying and the brushes with death of both her mother and father.

All of these letters revealed more than an opinionated young celebrity who was raised in a rock and roll world that most of us can only imagine. She is bright, funny, a loyal friend and loving daughter, sister and aunt. Would she get on your nerves? Maybe. Would she have your back? No doubt about it.

In addition to all of the feelings and relationships Kelly talks about, there are fun facts we learn about her life and the world as she perceives it. It was fun reading about life on the tour bus. She and Jack had some crazy childhood memories of the summers of Ozzfest on the bus that you better not be late boarding after the last set was played. If so, you held up everyone for hours getting stuck in the traffic leaving the venue.

I also loved the little tidbits of word trivia sprinkled throughout the book. Kelly was born and raised in England then returned there from the states when she turned 19. Anyone who has heard her knows she has a British accent that I hope she never loses. She adds little side bars explaining some of the slang she uses that is common in Great Britain, but means something totally different here. Here are a few of my favorites:

Gearbox: Vagina

Trump: Fart

Mullered: Wasted

Sunday Roast: A big family dinner that we do every Sunday

All in all, my notions of Kelly have changed. I would be honored to have her as a friend. She is a bright, funny, crazy young woman who is deeply loyal to those she loves. She has had personal problems, and honestly who hasn’t? Hers have just been made public by social media and fame.

I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a frank, truthful and brutally honest behind the scene look at what is is growing up as a celebrity. Of course every celebrity child’s life is shaped differently, but the constant scrutiny is always there unless their parents have found a way to keep them hidden from the paparazzi. Kelly Osbourne has opened up her life for all the world to see in there is no f*cking secret

Copyright © 2017 Laura Hartman

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Book Review: The Great Trouble – A Great Read for All Ages

The Great TroubleThe Great Trouble: A Mystery of London, the Blue Death & a Boy Called Eel

Deborah Hopkinson

234 pages

London 1854 is not a kind city for an orphan. Eel lives in a world where children live day to day in the filthy streets, sleeping under bridges, and begging, working, stealing for food. Eel has a steady job as an errand runner and a second job taking care of animals for Dr. John Snow a prominent London physician. Eel has it a bit better than other twelve-year-olds, but unfortunately he loses the errand job due to a thief and liar who has a grudge against him and the job with Dr. Snow does not pay him as much as he needs to make live.

Back on the streets, with a bad man from his past looking for him would seem like the worst thing that could happen. But Eel has a secret. This secret is costing him money each week that he does not have due to the boy that caused him to lose his job. His desperate attempt to make money forces him to make decisions that would terrify grown men, let alone a young boy.

With all of this going on, Eel goes to see a friend of his only to find the father of the family dying from “the blue death” which was cholera. The common theory is that this disease is spread by poisonous air, but Dr. Snow has a different theory. When he enlists Eel to help him investigate and support his theory.

Working against the clock amid the death knocking at almost every door in the neighborhood, Eel faces friends and foes to help the Doctor. This just might be the best thing that has ever happened to him.

This book was written for children 10 years and up. I am way past 10 and was thoroughly engrossed in this story. There was history, mystery, science, intrigue and relationships to wonder and worry about. The story is based on real people and the actual cholera epidemic in London.

I loved the way Hopkinson wrapped the true events in a great story that adds depth to the story to keep the reader’s interest high. As a bonus, at the end of the novel, she has biographical information on each of the characters that were based upon real people, including pictures of them. She also tells the reader about the books available for more information on the Broad Street cholera epidemic and the efforts of Dr. John Snow to stop the Blue Death from spreading.

I would recommend this book to adults and children that are interested in history and mysteries. It would be a great read-along for a classroom or with your child if it seems too long for him or her to read alone. The story will keep their interest.

If you don’t have any children to share this great book with, read it yourself. You won’t be disappointed.

 

Copyright © 2015 Laura Hartman

DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL CONNECTION: I have a material connection because I received a review copy that I can keep for consideration in preparing to write this content. I was not expected to return this item after my review

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