Tag Archives: gardening

Book Review: Grow Kind – The World Needs More Kindness

Grow Kind

By Jon Lasser and Sage Foster-Lasser

Illustrations by Christopher Lyles

Kiko loves to work in her garden. She shares the veggies, flowers and fruit she harvests with her friends and neighbors. She even shares with the grumpy man that shouted at her dog.

She also shares with others she does not know. The homeless person Kiko and her mom encounters on the way to school is very happy to receive the kindness of fresh produce. On show and tell day, Kiko brings fresh snacks to everyone in her class. Sharing her harvest makes everyone happy.

The message of this story is sweet and kind and the illustrations are adorable. I am a bit confused when trying to put it in the one of the usual “boxes” for children’s books. It has more words that illustrations so I hesitate to label it as a picture book. Some of the words are too difficult for an early reader. I do like the message and the question at the very end for children; “How do you grow kind?”. This emphasizes the heart of the message and gives caregivers a springboard to open the conversation with young children to think about others. I feel that the author wants the important people in the child’s life to read Grow Kind with and to them. In this egocentric world, it is refreshing to see a book that gently reminds children and their caregivers just how much a simple act of kindness can impact the giver and the recipient. We need more kindness.

DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL CONNECTION: I have a material connection because I received a review copy for free from Netgalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Copyright © 2020 Laura Hartman

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review

Book Review: The Skeleton Garden – Airplanes, bodies, gardening..Great Mystery!

The Skeleton GardenThe Skeleton Garden (Potting Shed Mystery #4) 
by Marty Wingate

Long lost brother and sister, Simon and Pru are reunited in adulthood. Pru was raised by their parents in the United States, while Simon was left behind in England to be raised by his mother’s relatives, Birdie and George Parke. He was told his parents died in a car accident. Even though he was brought up in a loving home, to find out his family left him behind had a devastating effect on him to say the least.

Pru  and her new husband Christopher move to Chelsea to spend a year house sitting and working on a proper English garden. The current gardener is actually her brother, and she is thrilled to share her love of gardening with him, but everything isn’t coming up roses. She and her husband settle in, she in the garden, Christopher working with the local police but there are skeletons in the garden, both figuratively and literally .

Things are not always sweetness and light between brother and sister, they are learning to get along as siblings and gardeners. Simon is thrilled to be chosen to show off the garden in an upcoming issue of a very prestigious gardening magazine, but Pru has a bad feeling about the whole idea. There is so much to do the pair wonder how it will be possible to get done. Then Christopher’s teenage nephew is sent to live with them because he got in a bit of trouble and his parents want him to be removed from the situation. Orlando isn’t too keen on working in the garden. As a matter of fact, Pru spends more time fixing the problems he creates by taking short cuts.

Things change for everyone when a plane from the war and a skeleton is found buried in the garden. Christopher is working the investigation to see if they can find the identity of the bones. Then one of the locals winds up dead in the garden, this crime casts suspicion on almost everyone in the village.

Pru can’t help herself – she has too many questions and not enough answers so she quietly talks to the people she has become close to hoping to help Christopher crack the case. But will this happen without more murders?

This is the fourth Potting Shed Mystery, but the first one I’ve read. It worked perfectly well as a standalone novel. I was not confused about the characters and their relationship to each other.

I love the cast of characters. They were interesting and well developed. Pru’s relationships with her husband, brother, friends and cook brought so much life to her character I felt like having a cup of tea with her telling her everything would be ok! Evelyn, the cook, has a hard shell, but inside she is a soft, caring woman who loves her husband Peachey. I want her to cook for me, the recipes she whipped up while the other characters moved in and out of her kitchen sounded delicious.

Wingate wrote a solid mystery with as many twists and turns as an English garden maze. I enjoyed every minute of this book and will seek out the previous books in this series.

Copyright © 2016 Laura Hartman

DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL CONNECTION: I have a material connection because I received a review copy for free from House Party that I can keep for consideration in preparing to write this content. I was not expected to return this item after my review.

Leave a comment

Filed under cooking, England, family, history, House Party, Mystery