Masters Monday #3

I made my first swatch for the TKGA Master’s program this weekend. I chose to make swatch number 3 first because, quite frankly, it is the easiest one. It is a small, 4.5 inch seed stitch swatch. I am familiar with the stitch, have used it many times to edge washcloths and cuff hats. But I’ve never had a knitting expert examine my stitches before, so that made me knit a little slower than usual to make sure each stitch was as close to perfect as possible.

I am using the required worsted weight yarn in a cream color. I purchased it from Unwind Yarn House (http://unwindyarnhouse.com/). They were at Stitches Midwest, and I liked the feel of their yarns. The kind I purchased is Timothy Street, and has wonderful definition. Each stitch can be seen, which exactly suits my needs for this project.

Debbie's washcloth

The edging of this washcloth I made last Christmas is seed stitch, which keeps it from rolling. Seed stitch may be an easy stitch, but I thought I’d learn a bit more about its origins if I could. Thanks to the internet, anything can be found. My first stop was http://knitting.about.com/od/stitchglossary/g/seedstitch.htm. Here I found out that it is made by working multiples of 2 stitches. Either an odd number of stitches in each row, working k1, p1 for each row (this was the requirement of my swatch) or alternate even number of stitch rows k1, p1 and p1, k1. Most knitters know this already. 

What I didn’t know was it is also called the “British or Irish Moss Stitch”. The Tricksy Knitter website (http://www.tricksyknitter.com/knitting-stitches/irish-moss-stitch-634) also calls it the rice stitch.

The dense fabric this stitch creates (no matter what you call it) is very useful, but apparently it isn’t that interesting because every site basically said the same thing.

I’m glad the questions that have to be answered aren’t about the history or uniqueness of the seed, moss or rice stitch.

 

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Filed under Knitting, Knitting Techniques, TKGA Master's Program

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